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Posts Tagged ‘nightlife’

When out for a night on the town (or in our apartments) in college, the night would undoubtedly end in some greasy, salty, sugary and/or buttery scavenger hunt. Whether it was found in the oven, at 7-11 or, God forbid, the BK Lounge, it happened far more often than I would care to admit.

I had assumed that Korea, being a nation of practically professional drinkers, would be a part of this late-night shame eating as well. The majority of their street food is battered and deep-fried afterall. But what I’ve found is the exact opposite. I’ve already written about the pork back bone soup that we ate one night. We’ve also eaten galbi, which is just meat that you cook at your table and wrap in lettuce, and the occasional mandu (dumpling) on our way home if we were really hungry. None of these even come close to the artery-invading powers of the King’s Quad stacker (which I am proud to say I have never eaten…don’t worry mom!).

Photo by Anna Waigand

The most surprising late-night snacks we have come upon came about after a kimchibilly, Korea’s version of Rock-a-billy, concert about a week ago. We left the roaring, punk, Elvis-inspired concert to find ourselves in need of another location to hang out and our bellies in need of some grub. We found a nice little place with a white brick interior packed with plenty of 20- or 30-somethings. When we ordered we used the point-and-pray method: point at what another table has and pray that it tastes as good as it looks. What we received tasted as if it had been sent from heaven.

First, we ordered pajong, a savory fried pancake with vegetables and seafood. It was greasy, as all pajong are, but even through the grease it was stuffed with fresh vegetables and squid. I don’t know any late-night snacks in America that include fresh seafood. This makes it a unique find I treasure on my late-night food round-ups.

Delicious, simple and healthy. Photo by Anna Waigand

Second was a fat metal bowl filled with small clams each about one inch wide. There were about 80 clams in all. No soup to go with it. Nothing fried. No batter. Just fresh boiled clams with some soy dipping sauce. Simply put, it was delicious. And you even had to work for your food. It’s hard to beat that amount of deliciousness without adding fats and carbs.

Third, we had my favorite dish of the night: dubu kimchi. This is a three part dish. There is the obvious, kimchi. And this was a delicious kimchi: spicy, tangy, and with a gingery zing. It was slightly sauteed which helped to bring out the spices while keeping just a dab of heat inside the strips of fermented cabbage. This was complemented perfectly with a thick, hot tofu and juicy steamed samgyeopsal (pork belly) slices. The kimchi’s zing was tempered by the simplicity of the hot tofu and pork. It’s a dish I’ve craved everyday since I ate it, which is very shocking to me because, well, I don’t like tofu. But this tofu was warm and soft. It slid down my throat with a heated ease after the spicy-heat of the kimchi. It was like coming home from a cold day out in the snow, slightly warming and just plain old comforting. And let’s not forget, it is as healthy as can be (as long as you don’t eat the huge fat chunks on the samgyeopsal).

Sorry, it went to fast for a pre-eating shot. But trust me, it really was pretty. Photo by Anna Waigand

So next time you’ve had a few mugs of beer, sips of wine, or shots of soju, remember: It doesn’t always have to be greasy, gross, or gosh-darned bad for you to be oh so gut-pleasingly good.

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Wow that is a lot of neon lights

One thing we noticed soon after arriving in Seoul is that the stereotype of tiny streets in giant Asian cities lined with flashing neon signs is totally true. All of those bad Hollywood action films hadn’t steered me wrong. Every street has a lot of neon signs saying things we can’t read, but when Anna and I explored the neighborhood around Konkuk University this weekend we were blown away by the blinking, flashing, strobe light mass of neon that surrounded one intersection. This video was taken at about 7 p.m. on a Saturday. Check it out.

Video by Anna Waigand

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